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OPEC defies Joe Biden with oil supply cut, just as EU agrees price cap

The global cartel agreed to cut output by 2 million barrels a day, driving up prices and creating a new economic and political headache for the West.

  • Updated
  • Hans van Leeuwen

RBA rate pivot ‘perfectly sensible’: former Fed leader

Recently retired Federal Reserve vice chairman Randal Quarles praised the RBA’s Philip Lowe for not raising rates too fast.

  • Matthew Cranston

Russian troops flee even as Putin finalises ‘annexation’

Ukrainian forces have recaptured dozens of settlements in the past few days in the country’s south, but the Kremlin is confident they will be ‘returned’.

  • Jonathan Landay and Felix Hoske

‘Quite workable’: Former Fed leader backs Truss’ tax cut plan

Britain’s original program was workable, says former Federal Reserve vice chairman Randal Quarles, but a watered-down version may not be.

  • Matthew Cranston and Hans van Leeuwen

British PM sets out a classic Thatcherite playbook

The embattled Liz Truss didn’t reveal any policies, but forcefully laid out her values: cut red tape, put tax money back in people’s pockets, shrink the state.

  • Hans van Leeuwen

Dating apps are thriving in China – but not for romance

COVID-19 lockdowns have shifted relationships in China. So much so that many are turning to dating apps to find friends.

  • Chang Che and Zixu Wang

Opinion & Analysis

Trump’s origins in a New York world of con men, mobsters and hustlers

Trump’s rise to national power would not have been possible but for a social, cultural, political and moral breakdown that overtook New York.

Sean Wilentz

Contributor

How Boris Johnson helped the EU get its groove back

The ousted British prime minister accidentally saved the European Union. Now it looks stronger than ever.

Simon Kuper

Contributor

The tragedy of Liz Truss is that she had a serious point

The supply side reforms that she has now managed to make toxic are what a low-growth Britain actually needs.

Janan Ganesh

Contributor

Xi Jinping’s third term is a tragic error

China’s macroeconomic, microeconomic and environmental difficulties remain largely unaddressed.

Martin Wolf

Columnist

From the Financial Times

Xi Jinping’s third term is a tragic error

China’s macroeconomic, microeconomic and environmental difficulties remain largely unaddressed.

  • Martin Wolf

Twitter bid at agreed price would boost trust in fair dealing

A deal at the original price would not only benefit jaded Twitter investors, it would also show that US capitalism is robust enough to ensure tycoons keep their side of a bargain.

  • The Lex Column

This is what happens when conspiracy theorists run countries

Conspiracy theorists have moved from the streets to the suites, and the most dangerous of them all is Vladimir Putin, who is threatening the world with nuclear war.

  • Gideon Rachman
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More From Today

Trump’s origins in a New York world of con men, mobsters and hustlers

Trump’s rise to national power would not have been possible but for a social, cultural, political and moral breakdown that overtook New York.

  • Sean Wilentz

How Boris Johnson helped the EU get its groove back

The ousted British prime minister accidentally saved the European Union. Now it looks stronger than ever.

  • Simon Kuper

Yesterday

Musk’s 19,000 tweets show how he hates (and loves) Twitter

The richest man in the world has a love-hate relationship with Twitter, the company he just (again) agreed to buy. But analysis of his 19,000 tweets shows he may still not want it.

  • Updated
  • Linda Chong, Rachel Lerman and Jeremy B. Merrill

The tragedy of Liz Truss is that she had a serious point

The supply side reforms that she has now managed to make toxic are what a low-growth Britain actually needs.

  • Janan Ganesh

NZ raises cash rate half-point to 3.5pc

New Zealand’s determination to keep lifting rates quickly contrasts with the Reserve Bank of Australia, which yesterday delivered a smaller-than-expected increase.

  • Ben McKay and Tracy Withers
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Xi Jinping’s third term is a tragic error

China’s macroeconomic, microeconomic and environmental difficulties remain largely unaddressed.

  • Martin Wolf

Trump Senate pick hit by abortion scandal as midterms near

Pro-life Republican candidate Herschel Walker has been rocked by controversy as next month’s US midterm elections heat up.

  • Matthew Cranston

Twitter bid at agreed price would boost trust in fair dealing

A deal at the original price would not only benefit jaded Twitter investors, it would also show that US capitalism is robust enough to ensure tycoons keep their side of a bargain.

  • The Lex Column

Elon Musk always had the odds stacked against him in Delaware

The Delaware Chancery Court is one place still more powerful than the world’s richest man – and his latest change of mind shows it.

  • Updated
  • Matthew Cranston

‘Doing things differently’: Truss battles to control fractious MPs

The British PM says she must disrupt the status quo. But her reformist zeal looked at risk as ministers lined up to voice dissent, undermining her authority.

  • Updated
  • Hans van Leeuwen

How the Tory tribe is struggling to hang together

The Conservative Party conference is always an odd affair, but this year it had an added dimension of strangeness.

  • Updated
  • Hans van Leeuwen

ASX-listed DroneShield wins US Defence contract

The anti-drone tech company says its $1.8 million deal will lead to significantly larger contracts with the world’s biggest military.

  • Matthew Cranston

This Month

Credit Suisse’s turnaround just got a lot tougher

To underpin sustainable profit, Credit Suisse is aiming to streamline the investment bank and expand its wealth management business, which soaks up less capital.

  • Oliver Hirt and Carolina Mandl

This is what happens when conspiracy theorists run countries

Conspiracy theorists have moved from the streets to the suites, and the most dangerous of them all is Vladimir Putin, who is threatening the world with nuclear war.

  • Gideon Rachman

Let’s put market’s ‘little turbulence’ behind us, UK treasurer says

“What a day!” ... Kwasi Kwarteng will set out his debt-cutting plans this month rather than next, as he tries to move on from the economic “distraction”.

  • Updated
  • Hans van Leeuwen
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Credit Suisse terrifies investors with its message of reassurance

Attempts to restore calm can be spectacularly unsettling. They imply that someone somewhere thinks the business is in serious trouble.

  • Updated
  • The Lex Column

Nobel winner unlocks the secret of Neanderthal DNA

The discovery by Sweden’s Svante Pääbo helped researchers track genetic differences in modern humans and how they affect various diseases, including COVID-19.

  • Benjamin Mueller

Ukraine forces break through Russian defences in south

Making their biggest breakthrough in the south since the war began, Ukrainian forces recaptured several villages in an advance along the strategic Dnipro River.

  • Jonathan Landay and Tom Balmforth

Warnings as North Korea missile flies over Japan

Japan has issued a rare warning for some residents to seek shelter after North Korea launched a ballistic missile over the country on Tuesday.

  • Michael Smith

Brazil braces for ‘white-knuckle race’ between Bolsonaro and Lula

The contest could swing either way and promises to prolong what has been a bruising battle that polarised the country and tested the strength of its democracy.

  • Jack Nicas, Flávia Milhorance and André Spigariol